HAÏTI Paper Money,
Bernard Kock Issues, Ca. 1863

     

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President Nicolas Geffrard
President of Haïti 
 
Nicolas Geffrard
1

President Abraham Lincoln
President of USA
Abraham Lincoln
2

Image Needed

Governor/Superintendent:
 Bernard Kock

Printer: Arthur Gregory & Co. Engr. New York

HAÏTI Banknotes, Bernard Kock Private issues, Ca. 1863

REPUBLIC OF HAÏTI

ESP Hispaniola 1492; FRA  Saint-Domingue 1697-1804; GBR 1793-98; indep. HTI 1.1.1804
PRIVATE ISSUES
N.688 - N.690, P.UNL  0.5G, 1G Images Needed
Haiti N.692, P.UNL 2 Gourdes Haitiennes 1.1.1863
 N.692, .P.UNL  2 Gourdes Haïtiennes/
2
Haïtian Dollars  Port St. Minna  1.1.1863
Remainder -  Signed by Bernard Kock
Ponterio & Associates, Inc.  Sale#112
4/27/01  Lot 1382  $2700  Hammer Price
Haiti N.694, P.UNL 5 Gourdes Haitiennes 1.1.1863
N.694, P.UNL   5 Gourdes Haïtiennes/

5 Haïtian Dollars  Port St. Minna  1.1.1863
Remainder  Signed by Bernard Kock
Ponterio & Associates, Inc.  Sale#112
4/27/01 Lot 1383  $2700 Hammer Price
N.696 - N.698, P.UNL  10G, 20G Images Needed

ABSTRACT

Bernard Kock was an opportunist and entrepreneur with a grand plan for colonizing Ile A'Vache (Cow Island), Haïti with 5,000 American black slaves.
Two Presidents with complimentary goals, Geffrard of Haïti and Lincoln of the USA, helped Kock start his venture in 1863. But the critical factor of
reliable funding never materialized and Kock was "left out to dry" by his investors with the 500 black émigrés suffering the consequences. Kock had
noble plans of building schools, churches and medical facilities and instituting profit sharing for the slaves, none of which ever materialized.

The Haïtian government provided an inducement for the workers to eventually become Haïtian citizen farmers or landholders. These lofty goals also
never ever materialized. Kock's currency, without backing, could only be used at his company stores, chits by current standards. Along with a new
partner, Surville Toussaint, Kock secured a similar agreement for Cayemite Island but smallpox on A'Vache took its toll and killed 25 workers.
Ile
A'Vache folded in December 1863 when Kock's financial partners abandoned their interest. Visiting his island for the last time on 20 December 1863
Kock found the workers demoralized and "many of them had gone actually mad, under the influence of some religious excitement, to which they had
surrendered themselves", perhaps a veiled reference to Voodoo. On 22 December 1863 President Lincoln sent a ship to bring the remaining
slaves back to the US abandoning any future colonization plans. 

The complete article on Bernard Kock is currently under revision.

We gratefully acknowledge Richard H. Ponterio of  Ponterio & Associates, Inc. for permission to use the above banknote photos.

REFERENCES

1.

Photo, Library of Congress

2. Photo, Matthew Brady
3. STATEMENT OF FACTS in relation to the
  Settlement on the Island of A'Vache
NEAR HAYTI, W.I. of a colony under BERNARD KOCK
 with Documentary Evidence and Affidavits,
 NEW YORK  WM. C. BRYANT & CO.,
 PRINTERS 41 NASSAU ST. COR LIBERTY 1864
4. Guide to Hayti, James Redpath,
 Originally published in 1861 by Haytian Bureau of Migration,
 Reprint 1970, Negro University Press, page 18
5. The Haitian People, James G. Leyburn
 © 1941 Yale University Press

© Garry Saint, Esquire 1999 - 2009